Cover image for Port designer's handbook
Title:
Port designer's handbook
Personal Author:
Edition:
3rd ed.
Physical Description:
xvii, 587 pages : illustrations, maps ; 26 cm.
ISBN:
9780727760043
General Note:
Previous edition: 2010.

Available:*

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Call Number
Material Type
Item Category 1
Status
PSZ JB 30000010345634 TC209 T48 2014 Open Access Book Book
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PSZ KL 33000000008779 TC209 T48 2014 Open Access Book Book
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Summary

Summary

This comprehensively updated new edition to the bestselling Port Designer's Handbook, gives essential guidance and recommendations for the layout, design and construction of modern port structures for practising port and harbour consulting engineers and contractors involved in the layout, design and construction of berth and harbour structures.


Author Notes

Carl A. Thoresen has over 45 years' experience as a professional consulting engineer, involved in nearly 800 port and harbour projects worldwide. He has worked for the Norwegian Agency for International Development, the World Development Bank, the Asian Development Bank and the African Development Bank. He has overseen waterways, harbours, commercial multi-purpose and container terminals, lighthouses, breakwaters ferry berths and marinas. He has been a member of many official technical committees for harbour design, constructions and waterfront structures, and has been actively involved in many of the International Navigation Association PIANC's working groups.


Table of Contents

Forewordp. xi
Preface and acknowledgementsp. xiii
About the authorp. xvii
01 Port planningp. 1
1.1 Introductionp. 1
1.2 Planning proceduresp. 1
1.3 Subsurface investigationsp. 14
1.4 Hydraulic laboratory studiesp. 23
1.5 Life-cycle managementp. 27
1.6 Safety management and risk assessmentp. 27
1.7 The International Ship and Port Facility Security (ISPS) Code and the Container Security Initiative (CSI)p. 29
References and further readingp. 35
02 Environmental forcesp. 37
2.1 Generalp. 37
2.2 Windp. 37
2.3 Wavesp. 50
2.4 Currentp. 66
2.5 Ice forcesp. 73
References and further readingp. 77
03 Channels and harbour basinsp. 79
3.1 Channels and waterwaysp. 79
3.2 Harbour basinp. 83
3.3 Anchorage areasp. 92
3.4 Area of refugep. 95
3.5 Grounding areasp. 96
References and further readingp. 97
04 Berthing requirementsp. 99
4.1 Operational conditionsp. 99
4.2 Navigationp. 103
4.3 Tugboat assistancep. 111
4.4 Wind and wave restrictionsp. 121
4.5 Ship movementsp. 129
4.6 Passing shipsp. 139
4.7 Visibilityp. 139
4.8 Port regulationsp. 139
4.9 Availability of a berthp. 139
References and further readingp. 141
05 Impact from shipsp. 143
5.1 Generalp. 143
5.2 The theoretical or kinetic methodp. 143
5.3 The empirical methodp. 151
5.4 The statistical methodp. 151
5.5 Abnormal impactsp. 152
5.6 Absorption of fender forcesp. 152
5.7 Ship 'hanging' on the fendersp. 155
References and further readingp. 155
06 Design considerationsp. 157
6.1 Generalp. 157
6.2 Design lifep. 160
6.3 Standards, guidelines and design codesp. 162
6.4 Load combinations and limit statesp. 163
6.5 Load and concurrency factorsp. 165
6.6 Material factors and material strengthp. 165
6.7 Characteristic loads from the sea sidep. 165
6.8 Vertical loads on berth structuresp. 167
6.9 Horizontal loads on the berthp. 172
6.10 Characteristic loads from the land sidep. 172
6.11 Summary of loads acting from the sea sidep. 173
References and further readingp. 173
07 Safety considerationsp. 175
7.1 Generalp. 175
7.2 Specification safetyp. 175
7.3 Design safetyp. 175
7.4 Construction safetyp. 179
7.5 Personnel safetyp. 179
7.6 Operational safetyp. 179
7.7 Total safetyp. 179
References and further readingp. 180
08 Types of berth structuresp. 181
8.1 Generalp. 181
8.2 Vertical loadsp. 183
8.3 Horizontal loadsp. 185
8.4 Factors affecting the choice of structuresp. 191
8.5 Norwegian and international berth constructionp. 195
References and further readingp. 195
09 Gravity-wall structuresp. 197
9.1 Generalp. 197
9.2 Block wall berthsp. 197
9.3 Caisson berthsp. 200
9.4 Cell berthsp. 202
References and further readingp. 214
10 Sheet pile wall structuresp. 215
10.1 Generalp. 215
10.2 Driving of steel sheet pilesp. 216
10.3 Simple anchored sheet pile wall berthsp. 222
10.4 Solid platform berthsp. 226
10.5 Semi-solid platform berthp. 231
10.6 Drainage of steel sheet pilesp. 232
References and further readingp. 232
11 Open berth structuresp. 235
11.1 Generalp. 235
11.2 Column berthsp. 240
11.3 Pile berthsp. 246
11.4 Lamella berthsp. 259
11.5 Open berth slabsp. 261
References and further readingp. 287
12 Berth detailsp. 289
12.1 Generalp. 789
12.2 Traditional mooring systemp. 289
12.3 Automate mooring systemp. 301
12.4 Lightingp. 302
12.5 Electric power supplyp. 302
12.6 Potable and raw water supplyp. 304
12.7 Water drainage systemp. 304
12.8 Sewage disposalp. 306
12.9 Oil and fuel interceptorsp. 306
12.10 Access laddersp. 306
12.11 Handrails and guardrailsp. 306
12.12 Kerbsp. 306
12.13 Lifesaving equipmentp. 306
12.14 Pavementsp. 307
12.15 Crane railsp. 316
References and further readingp. 319
13 Container terminalsp. 321
13.1 Site locationp. 321
13.2 Existing areasp. 322
13.3 Potential areasp. 322
13.4 Container shipsp. 324
13.5 Terminal areasp. 326
13.6 Ship-to-shore cranep. 330
13.7 Container handling systemsp. 336
13.8 The terminal area requirementsp. 345
13.9 The world's largest container portsp. 352
References and further readingp. 352
14 Fendersp. 355
14.1 Generalp. 355
14.2 Fender requirementsp. 356
14.3 Surface-protecting and energy-absorbing fendersp. 357
14.4 Different types of fenderp. 362
14.5 Installationp. 363
14.6 Effects of fender compressionp. 365
14.7 Properties of a fenderp. 368
14.8 Single- and double-fender systemsp. 375
14.9 Fender wallp. 377
14.10 Hull pressurep. 380
14.11 Spacing of fendersp. 381
14.12 Cost of fendersp. 382
14.13 Damage to fender structuresp. 383
14.14 Calculation examplesp. 385
14.15 Information from fender manufacturersp. 389
References and further readingp. 401
15 Erosion protectionp. 403
15.1 Generalp. 403
15.2 Erosion due to wave actionp. 407
15.3 Erosion due to the main propeller actionp. 408
15.4 Erosion due to thrustersp. 411
15.5 The required stone protection layerp. 414
15.6 Erosion protection systemsp. 415
15.7 Operational guidelinesp. 424
References and further readingp. 425
16 Steel corrosionp. 427
16.1 Generalp. 427
16.2 Corrosion ratep. 428
16.3 Corrosion protection systemsp. 429
16.4 Astronomical low water corrosionp. 431
16.5 Stray current corrosionp. 433
References and further readingp. 433
17 Underwater concretingp. 435
17.1 Generalp. 435
17.2 Different methods of underwater concretingp. 435
17.3 The tremie pipe methodp. 437
17.4 The production of concrete for use tremie pipesp. 449
17.5 Anti-washout (AWO) concretep. 451
17.6 Damage during construction of new structuresp. 455
17.7 Repairs of new concretep. 458
17.8 Concrete plant and supervisionp. 459
References and further readingp. 462
18 Concrete deteriorationp. 463
18.1 Generalp. 463
18.2 Durability of concrete berth structuresp. 464
18.3 Freezing and thawingp. 465
18.4 Erosionp. 466
18.5 Chemical deteriorationp. 466
18.6 Corrosion of reinforcementp. 467
18.7 Resistivityp. 473
18.8 Condition surveyp. 473
18.9 Concrete coverp. 475
18.10 Surface treatmentsp. 476
18.11 Condition surveyp. 476
18.12 Overloading of the berth structurep. 477
18.13 In-situ quality controlp. 478
References and further readingp. 478
19 Concrete repairp. 479
19.1 Generalp. 479
19.2 Assessmentp. 479
19.3 Maintenance manual and service inspectionp. 480
19.4 Condition of a structurep. 481
19.5 Repairs of concretep. 482
19.6 Repairs in Zone 1 (permanently submerged)p. 484
19.7 Repairs in Zone 2 (tidal zone)p. 489
19.8 Repairs in Zone 3 (the splash zone or the area above HAT)p. 491
19.9 Cathodic protectionp. 496
19.10 Chloride extractionp. 500
19.11 Costs of repairsp. 501
References and further readingp. 501
20 Port maintenancep. 503
20.1 Responsibility for maintenancep. 503
20.2 Sparesp. 503
20.3 Management informationp. 503
20.4 Maintenance personnelp. 504
20.5 Plant and equipmentp. 504
20.6 Infrastructurep. 505
20.7 Optimisation of design to reduce future maintenance costsp. 506
20.8 Maintenance managementp. 510
20.9 Maintenance strategyp. 510
20.10 Inspectionsp. 511
20.11 Rating and prioritisatonp. 513
20.12 Condition assessment ratingsp. 513
20.13 Post-event condition ratingsp. 514
20.14 Recommendations and follow-up actionsp. 515
20.15 Repair prioritisationp. 516
20.16 Maintenance data managementp. 516
References and further readingp. 516
21 Ship dimensionsp. 517
21.1 Generalp. 517
21.2 Ship dimensionsp. 518
21.3 Recommended design dimensionsp. 530
21.4 Recommendationsp. 548
References and further readingp. 548
22 Definitionsp. 549
References and further readingp. 558
23 Conversion factorsp. 559
23.1 Lengthp. 559
23.2 Speedp. 559
23.3 Areap. 559
23.4 Volumep. 560
23.5 Weightp. 560
23.6 Forcep. 560
23.7 Force per unit lengthp. 560
23.8 Force per unit areap. 560
23.9 Momentp. 561
23.10 Temperaturesp. 561
23.11 Useful datap. 561
Indexp. 563