Cover image for Intelligent buildings : design, management and operation
Title:
Intelligent buildings : design, management and operation
Edition:
2nd ed.
Publication Information:
London : ICE Publishing, 2013
Physical Description:
xx, 344 p. : ill. ; 25 cm.
ISBN:
9780727757340
Subject Term:
Added Author:

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PRZS 35000000000850 TH6012 I58 2013 Open Access Book Book
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PSZ JB 30000010325256 TH6012 I58 2013 Open Access Book Book
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PSZ KL 33000000010034 TH6012 I58 2013 Open Access Book Book
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Summary

Summary

This unique book correlates the latest knowledge about the design, management, technology and sustainability of intelligent buildings with the cultural developments affecting the way people live and work. Intelligent Buildings provides a thorough introduction to all the key areas of this important subject, with contributions from leading academics and practitioners in the field and featuring a series of real-life case studies. It will serve as a valuable text for students in architecture, engineering and built environment courses, as well as professionals involved in building procurement, design and management. The second edition reflects the pace of change in terms of innovation of building services and IT and the sustainable green approach to building design in terms of energy, water, waste and pollution. The case studies have been updated and expanded to include intelligent systems and new market opportunities.


Table of Contents

(Dr Baoxing Qiu)D.J. Clements-CroomeD.J. Clements-CroomeD.J. Clements-CroomeM.L. LehmanV. CallaghanC. Qancea and S. QahianuT. Keeling and D.J. Clements-Croome and R. Luck and P. PointerK. Liu and S. GulliverV. Haines and V. MitchellM. DavisT. Dwyer and J Kimpian and L.C.M. TangS. Al-Bizri and C. GrayA. ElmualimZ. StrelitzP. Bellew and M. DaveyM. Beaven and D. WilsonJ. Godefroy and S. BurrH. AlWaer and D.J. Clements-CroomeN. PenneliH. AlWaer and F. Beltran and D.J. Clements-Croome and D. Melo
Forewordp. xi
Preface to the first editionp. xiii
Preface to the second editionp. xix
Part I People-centred sustainable design
01 Sustainable healthy intelligent buildings for peoplep. 1
1.1 Introductionp. 1
1.2 Terminologyp. 3
1.3 Integration: buildings, systems and peoplep. 4
1.4 People: environmental sensory designp. 7
1.5 Products and systemsp. 9
1.6 Processesp. 13
1.7 Innovationsp. 16
1.8 Tenets for planning design and management of intelligent buildingsp. 16
1.9 The futurep. 18
Referencesp. 20
Further readingp. 24
02 Lessons from Nature for sustainable architecturep. 25
2.1 Introductionp. 25
2.2 Patterns in naturep. 27
2.3 Fractal geometry and architecturep. 29
2.4 Behaviour studiesp. 30
2.5 Biophiliap. 30
2.6 Architecture inspired by naturep. 31
2.7 Case studiesp. 32
2.8 Conclusionsp. 35
Glossaryp. 36
Referencesp. 40
03 Environmental health and well-being in buildingsp. 43
3.1 Introductionp. 43
3.2 Environmental factorsp. 45
3.3 The nature of productivityp. 48
3.4 Measurement of productivityp. 50
3.5 Sick building syndromep. 50
3.6 Well-beingp. 51
3.7 Well-being and productivityp. 54
3.8 Conclusionsp. 56
Referencesp. 57
04 Environmental sensory designp. 61
4.1 Architecture as an extension of occupantsp. 61
4.2 The core of the sensory design method: narrativep. 63
4.3 Non-linear relationships between environmental design and perceptionp. 65
4.4 Strengthening the relationship between sensory modalities in architectural designp. 67
4.5 Incorporating sensory design into the designer's processp. 68
Referencesp. 69
Part II Intelligent, smart and digital approaches
05 Intelligent environmentsp. 71
5.1 Intelligent environmentsp. 71
5.2 Facets of intelligencep. 71
5.3 The changing nature of building appliancesp. 72
5.4 The intelligence continuump. 73
5.5 A simple embedded-agent architecturep. 74
5.6 End-user programmingp. 78
5.7 Adjustable autonomy agentsp. 79
5.8 Intelligent environments and peoplep. 80
5.9 Case study: the Essex iSpacep. 81
5.10 Summaryp. 84
Acknowledgementsp. 85
Referencesp. 85
06 Designing intelligent buildings for people's well-being using an artificial intelligence approachp. 89
6.1 Introductionp. 89
6.2 Artificial Intelligencep. 92
6.3 Conclusionsp. 103
Referencesp. 104
Further readingp. 105
07 Wireless sensors for monitoring people and their close environmentp. 107
7.1 Introductionp. 107
7.2 Key variables for sensor evaluationp. 109
7.3 Devices off the bodyp. 110
7.4 Devices worn on the bodyp. 111
7.5 Conclusionsp. 114
Acknowledgementsp. 116
Referencesp. 116
08 Designing intelligent pervasive spaces for living and workingp. 119
8.1 Pervasive informaticsp. 119
8.2 Computation and artificial intelligence technologiesp. 120
8.3 The notion of intelligent spacep. 121
8.4 Theories and techniques relevant to pervasive informaticsp. 122
8.5 Design and implementation: semiotics for requirements engineeringp. 124
8.6 Case study: smart network technologies for smart buildingsp. 128
8.7 Conclusionp. 131
Referencesp. 131
09 Intelligent energy saving in the home: a user centred design perspectivep. 133
9.1 What makes an intelligent home?p. 133
9.2 Key human factors issuesp. 135
9.3 The complexity of the home environmentp. 137
9.4 A user-cenfed design approach of the intelligent home of the futurep. 138
9.5 The futurep. 140
Referencesp. 140
Part III Management and operation processes
10 Procurement and management of integrated projectsp. 143
10.1 Introductionp. 143
10.2 The industry's attempts to improve performance over the last decadep. 144
10.3 The barriers that have continued to block radical changep. 145
10.4 The era for changep. 147
10.5 Procurement of integrated teamsp. 148
10.6 Management of integrated teamsp. 150
10.7 The role of the lawp. 153
10.8 The challenge for the future and the role of academiap. 153
Referencesp. 154
11 Building and virtual information modelling In intelligent buildingsp. 157
11.1 The evolution towards integrating building information modelling into the construction processp. 157
11.2 The revolution of modelling tools to move from design concept to operational realityp. 160
11.3 Moving BIM forward as part of a more effective collaborative construction processp. 163
Referencesp. 165
12 Design managementp. 167
12.1 Introductionp. 167
12.2 The design processp. 168
12.3 Systems view of The design processp. 173
12.4 Design process mappingp. 176
12.5 Planning the design processp. 180
12.6 Design team formation/design team integrationp. 193
Referencesp. 195
13 Intelligent and sustainable facilities managementp. 197
13.1 Introductionp. 197
13.2 Sustainable FMp. 199
13.3 Intelligent buildings and FM informaticsp. 203
13.4 Intelligent post-occupancy evaluation system (iPOEs)p. 206
13.5 Conclusionsp. 209
Referencesp. 209
Further readingp. 212
Part IV Case studies
14 The changing culture of living and working: physical and virtual modalitiesp. 215
14.1 Technology and distributed settingsp. 215
14.2 More tech versus low techp. 216
14.3 Collective needs: environmental sustainabilityp. 216
14.4 Scopep. 216
14.5 Optimising design for rapid social change: determining building intelligencep. 216
14.6 Techno and cultural change: disjunctions of overspecificityp. 217
14.7 Change in work, change in the workplacep. 218
14.8 Individualism and organisational reshapingp. 218
14.9 Building correlatesp. 219
14.10 Remote, itinerant and interactive workp. 219
14.11 Internal space budgetsp. 219
14.12 Supporting and measuring new space strategies: intelligent responsesp. 220
14.13 Work-life integrationp. 221
14.14 Multi-use spacep. 221
14.15 What makes for appealing space and durable design?p. 221
14.16 Effective design and productivityp. 222
14.17 Cost and valuep. 222
14.18 Building life cyclesp. 223
14.19 The fit-out as the arena to accommodate short-term cultural changep. 223
14.20 Special potential of the envelopep. 224
14.21 User input to project briefsp. 224
14.22 Post-occupancy evaluationp. 224
14.23 Unravelling multiple impactsp. 225
14.24 Technology, culture, designp. 225
Referencesp. 226
15 Gardens by the Bay, Singapore: intelligent building through design integration and optimisationp. 229
15.1 Introductionp. 229
15.2 The master planp. 231
15.3 Climatep. 233
15.4 Briefp. 233
15.5 Biome integrated designp. 235
15.6 Active system designp. 238
15.7 Fresh air conditioning using desiccantsp. 239
15.8 Energy generation and the energy centrep. 240
15.9 Supertrees designp. 241
15.10 Conclusionp. 242
Acknowledgementsp. 242
Further readingp. 243
16 Sky Studios, Hounslow, UK, and the internet of thingsp. 245
16.1 Sky Studiosp. 245
Box 16.1 Sky Studios - key factsp. 246
16.2 The internet of thingsp. 262
16.3 Conclusionp. 269
Referencesp. 270
17 Storey's Gate, London, UK - retrofitting intelligent design and systems in a Grade II listed buildingp. 271
17.1 Introductionp. 271
17.2 Creating a comfortable and stimulating environmentp. 271
17.3 Comfortable conditions through low-carbon solutionsp. 275
17.4 Further environmental measuresp. 279
17.5 User engagement and feedbackp. 279
Box 17.1 Programme datap. 280
Box 17.2 Energy and carbon datap. 280
Creditsp. 281
Appendixp. 281
Part V Futures
18 Intelligent, sustainable, liveable citiesp. 283
18.1 The cities landscapep. 283
18.2 Sustainable liveable citiesp. 285
18.3 Intelligent citiesp. 288
18.4 Cities as systemsp. 291
18.5 Design of cities as integral systemsp. 291
18.6 Planning intelligent sustainable liveable citiesp. 293
18.7 Collaborative governance of citiesp. 298
18.8 Lessons for an urbanising worldp. 299
18.9 Recommendationsp. 300
Acknowledgementsp. 300
Referencesp. 301
19 Opportunities and challenges for intelligent buildingsp. 305
19.1 Introductionp. 305
19.2 Intelligent buildings definedp. 306
19.3 Drivers for integrated intelligent buildingsp. 306
19.4 Creating valuep. 307
19.5 Meeting the client's brief for a smart buildingp. 307
19.6 A client's journey to an integrated intelligent building solutionp. 308
19.7 Value enhancement and non-rental income opportunitiesp. 310
19.8 Sustainable buildingsp. 311
19.9 Barriers and how to overcome themp. 311
19.10 The future of intelligent buildingsp. 312
20 Innovative futuresp. 313
20.1 Introductionp. 313
20.2 What is innovation?p. 314
20.3 Understanding the history of innovationp. 316
20.4 What should we expect from innovation?p. 319
20.5 Targets, ideas and trendsp. 319
20.6 Sustainabilityp. 322
20.7 Technology, information and global communicationsp. 322
20.8 Nano- and biotechnologyp. 324
20.9 Biomimeticsp. 324
20.10 Innovation around the worldp. 324
20.11 Innovative futures for sustainable intelligent buildings and citiesp. 324
20.12 Conclusionsp. 328
20.13 The futurep. 328
Referencesp. 330
Further readingp. 332
Indexp. 333