Cover image for Integrated design of a product family and its assembly system
Title:
Integrated design of a product family and its assembly system
Personal Author:
Publication Information:
Boston : Kluwer Academic Publishers, 2003
ISBN:
9781402074370
Added Author:

Available:*

Library
Item Barcode
Call Number
Material Type
Item Category 1
Status
PSZ JB 30000010046210 TA174 D454 2003 Open Access Book
Searching...

On Order

Summary

Summary

Integrated Design of a Product Family and Its Assembly System presents an integrated approach for the design of a product family and its assembly system, whose main principles consider the product family as a fictitious unique product for which the assembly system is to be devised. It imposes assembly and operation constraints as late as possible in the design process to get liberties in the system design, and adapts the product family at each design stage to integrate the new constraints related to the successive design choices.

Integrated Design of a Product Family and Its Assembly System is an important, must-have book for researchers and Ph.D. students in Computer-Integrated Manufacturing, Mechanical Engineering, and Manufacturing, as well as practitioners in the Design, Planning and Production departments in the manufacturing industry. Integrated Design of a Product Family and Its Assembly System is also suitable for use as a textbook in courses such as Computer-Aided Design, Concurrent Engineering, Design for Assembly, Process Planning, and Integrated Design.


Author Notes

Pierre De Lit: Universite libre de Bruxelles
Alain Delchambre: Universite libre de Bruxelles


Table of Contents

1. Introductionp. 1
1 Assemblyp. 1
1.1 What is assembly?p. 1
1.2 Assembly methodsp. 2
1.3 Assembly operationsp. 2
2 Assembly linesp. 6
2.1 Principlep. 6
2.2 Line modelsp. 7
3 Product and assembly line designp. 8
3.1 Design decompositionp. 8
3.2 Influences and interactionsp. 10
4 Scope of the bookp. 11
5 One typical case studyp. 13
6 Dispositionp. 15
2. State of the Artp. 19
1 PF and assembly line designp. 19
1.1 Design methodologiesp. 19
1.2 Integrated design approachesp. 20
2 Pf representationp. 29
2.1 Terminologyp. 29
2.2 PF structurep. 32
2.3 Discussionp. 45
3 Design for assemblyp. 48
3.1 Qualitative analysesp. 48
3.2 Quantitative analysesp. 48
3.3 DFA in integrated product and line designp. 51
3.4 Discussionp. 55
4 Ap representationsp. 57
4.1 Preliminary definitionsp. 58
4.2 Liaison- or command-based representationsp. 58
4.3 Component- and subset- based representationsp. 63
4.4 Discussionp. 69
5 Assembly planningp. 71
5.1 Quick browsep. 71
5.2 PG generationp. 72
5.3 Proposing SAsp. 79
6 Line designp. 80
6.1 Line design methods and algorithmsp. 80
6.2 Mhe selectionp. 82
3. Pf and Assembly Line Design Methodologyp. 85
1 Concurrent engineering and assemblyp. 85
2 Concurrent design and "optimisation" problemsp. 87
2.1 Industrial, multi-objective problems and optimisationp. 88
2.2 Solution stability and iterative proceduresp. 89
2.3 Concurrent development and design sensitivityp. 90
2.4 Design choices and solution space pruningp. 92
2.5 Preliminary conclusionsp. 94
3 Proposed design philosophy for PFs and assembly linesp. 94
3.1 Main principlesp. 95
3.2 PF structuring, DFA and preliminary APp. 95
3.3 Assembly technique and mode selection, detailed APp. 98
3.4 Line layoutp. 101
4 Conclusionsp. 103
4. Description of Product Familiesp. 105
1 Proposed PF structure representationp. 105
1.1 Preliminary definitionsp. 105
1.2 Generic and variant elementsp. 109
1.3 Decomposition of a PF into FEnsp. 111
1.4 Links between the FEnsp. 117
1.5 Description of a FEnp. 118
1.6 Description of the GCsp. 118
1.7 Description of the generic linksp. 120
1.8 Graphical representationsp. 121
1.9 Fens and design teamsp. 122
1.10 Synthesis of the modelp. 122
2 Illustrative case studyp. 123
2.1 Early designp. 123
2.2 Intermediate designp. 124
2.3 Detailed designp. 126
3 Conclusionsp. 128
5. Pf Structuring and Preliminary Dfap. 129
1 Objectives of the DFAp. 129
2 Proposed structuring and preliminary DFA issuesp. 130
2.1 How to obtain variations in the subfunctions of a PF?p. 131
2.2 Issues for VGCs, OGCs and pseudo-varying linksp. 133
2.3 PF structuring and standardisationp. 135
2.4 Preliminary DFA rulesp. 140
2.5 Summary of the approachp. 142
3 Case studyp. 144
3.1 Before the application of the DFAp. 144
3.2 Application of the DFAp. 146
4 Conclusionsp. 148
6. Representation of APS for PFSp. 151
1 Proposed AP representationp. 151
2 Examplesp. 153
3 Conclusionsp. 155
7. Preliminary Assembly Planningp. 157
1 Hypotheses on the APSp. 157
2 Proposed preliminary AP toolp. 158
2.1 AP methodologyp. 158
2.2 Constraints in the AP generationp. 159
2.3 Dealing with PCSp. 160
2.4 Determination of potential base partsp. 164
2.5 Proposing GSASp. 168
2.6 Constructing the PGS for FEnsp. 170
2.7 Merging the APS of FEns into APS for the PFp. 183
2.8 AP evaluation criteriap. 189
3 Case studyp. 193
3.1 AP at early design stagep. 193
3.2 AP after the preliminary design of MagSyst and Boxp. 194
3.3 AP after the preliminary design for the PFp. 195
4 Conclusionsp. 196
8. Detailed DFA and APp. 199
1 A detailed DFA principle for PFS: standardisationp. 199
2 Joining process and assembly method selectionp. 200
3 Detailed AP of the Fensp. 201
3.1 Modification of the generic liaison graphp. 201
3.2 Modification of the AP of the FEnsp. 203
3.3 AP and DFA: releasing PCSp. 208
3.4 Modification of the AP for the PFp. 209
3.5 From a PG between GCS to a PG between operationsp. 212
4 Equipment preselectionp. 212
4.1 Decomposing the operationsp. 212
4.2 Selecting the equipmentp. 216
4.3 Finalising the PF design and the APp. 217
5 Case studyp. 218
5.1 Design not challenging preliminary resultsp. 218
5.2 Design questioning former resultsp. 221
5.3 Comparisonp. 223
6 Conclusionsp. 224
9. Line Layoutp. 225
1 Line decompositionp. 226
1.1 Team-oriented assemblyp. 226
1.2 Defining and linking workcentresp. 226
2 Determination of the conveying systemp. 228
2.1 Conveyor selection in the proposed methodologyp. 229
2.2 Selection methodologyp. 229
2.3 MHE typology and evaluation criteriap. 229
2.4 Examplesp. 232
3 Logical layoutp. 234
3.1 Essentials on the LB and RP approachesp. 235
3.2 Whole thing in a nutshellp. 240
4 Differences between logical and physical layoutp. 241
5 Case studyp. 244
5.1 Old designp. 244
5.2 New designp. 245
6 Conclusionsp. 246
10. Conclusions and Further Workp. 249
1 Summary of the results and discussionp. 249
2 Further researchp. 254
Appendicesp. 257
Appendix A Precedence operatorsp. 257
1 Operator [precedes equals]p. 257
2 Operator [precedes]p. 258
Appendix B The Promethee II methodp. 259
Appendix C Glossaryp. 263
Referencesp. 265
Indexp. 279